Episode #33 - Turning waste bread into beer with Toast Ale

Show notes

This week's show is all about my conversation with Andrew Schein, one of the guys running Toast Ale. And we explore a whole range of food waste issues during our chat – not least the fact that around 25% of any loaf of bread is thrown away and wasted.

It’s something the business is trying to tackle, grabbing surplus bread that would normally be thrown away, toasting it and then using it as one of the key ingredients in its brewing process to make great-tasting ale.

It’s a great story and the company is going from strength to strength, with stockists across London.

But Toast Ale’s story raised an interesting question. When does a campaign become a business? And can that even happen successfully?

Andrew Schein from Toast Ale

Andrew Schein from Toast Ale

A growing number of organisations – and we’ve featured a number on the show in recent weeks (from Hubbub, to Fairphone) are starting life as a campaign and then, at some point, have transitioned to become commercial entities. As you will hear, Andrew (pictured right) is fairly philosophical about that transition – that the separation that they have created between the enterprise that founded Toast Ale (a campaign group called Feedback) and the actual business gives them a clearly defined path to growth.

Of course, we’ve talked lots about how companies are increasingly thinking about why they exist – and the need to move beyond existing purely to keep shareholders happy. But what if you exist, in part, to provide funds for sustaining a charitable enterprise? It’s a really interesting concept and certainly left me with food for thought.

As ever, let me know what you think of Toast Ale and what they are trying to do.

You can find out more about the business here. And you can follow Andrew and the team at Toast across social media, on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram.

Grab a bottle now: There are plenty of stockists of Toast's Pale Ale across London

Grab a bottle now: There are plenty of stockists of Toast's Pale Ale across London

Perfect bedfellows: Toasted bread and beer

Perfect bedfellows: Toasted bread and beer


This week's news round with Vikki Knowles featured:

- Airbus's new flying taxi plans
- The Cool Effect collection of carbon-reducing projects that need cash
- Why buy stuff when you have the Library of Things
- The Too Good To Go app to tackle food waste

 
 

Episode #17 - Forget Facebook. Meet the social network for social good

Show notes

Technology has a unique ability to create positive change – and the way in which people are using new software, tools, gadgets and gizmos is really driving the sustainable business agenda right now.

The way in which we interact with our planet, our things, our community and one another is being seriously aided by the advent of brand new, or repurposed technologies which are – hopefully –making it easier to just do the right thing.

This week's guest is Nick Davies, the creator of a social network called Neighbourly. To explain what it does most simply: makes it easier for companies to find community projects and charities to support – and then shout about the fact via it online platform functionality.

But it's so much more than that.

Nick delves into the detail during this week's show to explain how the platform – "the social network for social good" – has morphed and shifted into what it has become: an incredibly powerful tool for creating positive social and environmental change by connecting up the key players that can actually make things happen (business, NGO, charity, individual).

I hope you enjoy it.

Check out Neighbourly.com. It's free to join and free to post a project – and 'free' is how the site will remain forever, says Nick.

Nick Davies, founder, Neighbourly.com

Nick Davies, founder, Neighbourly.com


During this week's news round-up, we talk:

- Ikea's new range of sustainability-focused products
- Sadiq Khan's London mayoral victory 
- Etsy's plan to get its sellers topped with solar panel
- And gender diversity trends