Episode #52 - Be more toddler: Ella’s Kitchen founder on the key to business success

Show notes

The organic baby food market is about to explode even further.

While the global market is expected to account for $5.6 billion by 2020, representing an annual growth rate of more than 10%, the market in the so-called BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) is projected to reach $3.5 billion, a growth rate of a staggering 19.5% between now and 2020.

And that is because of a number of factors, including: Rapid urbanisation; rising parental concern to feed their child with healthy and chemical free products; health awareness programmes by regional governments; and a real emphasis on natural nourishment.

In the BRIC countries, the market is being fuelled by an increase in working mothers, a boost in organic commodities being produced, and government subsidies helping to support what still constitutes a fairly immature segment of the food market.

For centuries, a band of parents have poured over the labels of supermarket products, obsessively looking to give their kids the very best. And why not.

Right here, right now, that band of parents is now a giant flock of more informed, conscious, ethically-minded Mums, Dads and carers who not only want great tasty products for their kids, but are looking for help, support and inspiration to make healthy eat the norm a world saturated by high-sugar, high-salt and high fat kids foods. 

Ella’s Kitchen is one of an incredibly strong growing market of organic, ethically-sourced and healthy kids food taking the supermarket shelves by storm.

Founded by Paul Lindley back in 2006, and named after his first born, the business has not only worked hard to create good food that parents will keep reaching to put into their trolleys every week, but it has done so with a passionate belief in promoting healthy eating and giving Mums and Dads the tools to make the best choices for their children.

I caught up with Paul – who, having sold the business three years ago, is now chairman and “guardian of the mission” –  to find out all about Ella’s Kitchen and how he has taken his business from tiny start-up and turned it into a global phenomenon.

Episode #39 - What's the point of banking, anyway?


 

The Better Business Show, in association with Triodos

 
 
 

Show notes

Since the economic crash of 2008, the world’s financial institutions have been desperately rallying to regain public trust and restore their licence to operate.

As we know, the recklessness of some banks triggered a disastrous string of events – many of which have been played out, illustrated and re-enacted by books, articles, plays and films during the last 8 years.

The practices of those institutions in which we put our trust, our faith – and our money – to use it wisely, has, quite rightly, been put under a microscope like never before and has encouraged more and more of us to question the purpose of banking.

I bank with HSBC. I have done all my adult life. I remember going into my local branch (it was called The Midland Bank back in the 1990s) when I was 16 having started my first Saturday job, filling in some forms and waiting for my cheque book and bank card to arrive in the post the following week. It was such an exciting moment in my young life. 

But never did I once question whether I could trust that bank to take care of my money. Never did I ask where that money would be spent while I entrusted the bank with it.

As I say, I’m still an HSBC customer, for both my personal and business accounts; the rigamarole of switching accounts has always put me off. I’m not disgusted by what HSBC stands for – in fact, in some areas, like its investment in climate research, it is showing leadership – and so I have remained as a loyal customer.

But perhaps where we keep our money needs to be challenged once in a while.

And, this month on the Better Business Show we have a perfect opportunity to do just that. 

What’s the point of banking? What can financial institutions, with all their power and influence, do to help create a better, fairer and more sustainable world?

This week, we spend some time with Bevis Watts, the UK managing director for Triodos Bank, a company which believes that banking can be a powerful force for good: serving individuals and communities as well as building a more sustainable society. 

The businesses uses its €12 billion of customer deposits to generate social, environmental and cultural value in a transparent and sustainable way. Triodos isn't just a bank: its changing the way banking is done. And its customers – some of which we are going to be meeting in the next few weeks on the show – are helping to build a movement that’s cultivating positive social, environmental and cultural change.

You can find out more about Triodos and the way it conducts its business, at triodos.co.uk – where you can also find out just what sort of companies, organisations and projects it is supporting right now.

Enjoy the show. And, as ever, let us know what you think.