Episode #29 - ByFusion: Building the blocks to eliminate ocean waste

Episode 29 supported by:

Show notes

On the right is a picture of RePlast, an exciting new building block made entirely from plastic recovered from the ocean where it has been continuously dumped for generations.

While its viable applications are yet to be fully determined, the man behind the business bringing RePlast to life believes his company has a chance to take advantage of the 'perfect storm' brewing as the world wakes up to a huge problem which sees between 4 and 12 million tonnes of plastic spewed into our oceans every year.

By 2050, there will be more plastic in our oceans than fish, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

So, this week we explore RePlast, the company behind it, ByFusion, and its CEO Gregor Gomory, to discuss how RePlast is made, how it is being used (it has similar thermal characteristics to straw bales), and how to stay upbeat in the face of such a mammoth hill to climb in solving the issue of ocean plastic waste.

For more on ByFusion, check out the website. I also wrote this piece on the business for Sustainable Brands a few weeks back.

You can also find Gregor on Twitter and LinkedIn too.


This week's news round up with Vikki Knowles featured:

- The 8 pieces of tech PwC thinks you cannot ignore right now;
- The solar-powered plane that has just circumnavigated the globe;
- The company turning China's smog into diamonds. Yes, diamonds!; and
- High street fashion chain Zara's alleged plagiarism.


Our 'Big Ideas for a Sustainable Future' segment of the show, in association with Terrafiniti, concludes this week. We launched it to celebrate the launch of Terrafiniti's brand new series of e-books which offer thoughts, provocations and big ideas for how we might create a sustainable future on a planet of 9 billion people.

The Towards 9 Billion ebook series is out now and can be downloaded for free at the Terrafiniti website.

Episode #27 - Can we create a better world through play and adventure?

Episode 27, supported by:

Show notes

Andy Middleton gives a resounding 'yes' in response to the question posed in today's show – can play help to create a better world?

Through his organisation TYF – an adventure and activities-based business located on the Welsh coast – he believes getting people away from their desks in towns and cities and better connecting them to the natural world is the best way to encourage innovative, creative and sustainable thinking.

Andy shares with us his vision for connecting the rules of nature to the way we design our businesses – and why we need to put our values at the heart of what we do (and why play is so crucial to that process).

Enjoy the show.

And if you'd like to know more about TYF, head over the website.

You can also follow Andy on Twitter @GrinGreen.

Andy Middleton, co-founder of TYF

Andy Middleton, co-founder of TYF

Andy presenting at a recent Do Lectures event.

Andy presenting at a recent Do Lectures event.

TYF's coasteering.

TYF's coasteering.

Coasteerers in action!

Coasteerers in action!


This week's news round-up, with the brilliant Vikki Knowles, featured stories on:

- The company turning beer waste into edible snacks (and the Food Rush magazine running the story
Ann-Christine Duhaime's research into turning the brain green.
- Elon Musk's poor excuse for an apology.
- The newly-launched Natural Capital Protocol.


Don't miss our Big Ideas for a Sustainable Future segment of the show, in association with Terrafiniti to celebrate the launch of a new brand new series of e-books which offer thoughts, provocations and big ideas for how we might create a sustainable future on a planet of 9 billion people.

This week, in Part 3 in the series, Joss Tantram, a founding partner of Terrafiniti, explores principles for putting sustainable value at the heart of economic price.

The Towards 9 Billion ebook series is out now and can be downloaded for free at the Terrafiniti website.


Episode #25 - The fashion house shaking up the industry by paying interns and ensuring models actually eat

Episode 25 supported by:


Show notes

This week, we're in the company of Heidy Rehman, the Founder and Managing Director of Rose & Willard, an ethical and feminist British womenswear brand based in London.

This is a company which has made pieces for Jennifer Aniston, Pippa Middleton, Gemma Arterton, Michelle Dockery, Naomie Harris and Elisabeth Moss and aims to lead a trend towards a more transparent, fairer womenswear and fashion industry in general.

Heidy Rehman, founder and managing director of Rose & Willard.

Heidy Rehman, founder and managing director of Rose & Willard.

This is a company with the lowest carbon footprint in the fashion Industry on account of the fact that it designs, cuts patterns, makes samples, manufactures and distributes all of its products from one location in South London.

This is one of the only fashion houses in London that pays its interns.

This is a company that is pioneering positive body image - making use of non-model models, despite pressure from the industry to use thinner models and to supply samples in a size 6.

This is a company that is always looking to source materials that are different, such as its fish leather.

“I was working as a top-ranked stock broker and unable to find clothing choices for women that could convey professionalism, femininity and individuality simultaneously,” says Heidy. “What I found on the high street was either too frumpy, desperately chasing trends or ludicrously expensive. 

“I created Rose & Willard to solve this problem. Just before I quit the corporate world, to focus on what is a labour of love for me, I released this report on Saudi Oil, which caused quite a stir. I hope to do the same in fashion industry.”

For more on Rose & Willard visit the website. You can also find the business on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


This week, we kick off a brand new segment of the show which will play out over the next few weeks.

We’ve been working with the team at Terrafiniti, an international consultancy that works with companies to help them develop leadership in ecological, social and business value. And part of that work culminates today in the launch of a brand new series of e-books which offer thoughts, provocations and big ideas for how we might create a sustainable future on a planet of 9 billion people.

In the face of scarce resources, a warming climate, erratic weather patterns, forced migration, hunger, poverty and a widening gap between those that have and those that do not, fostering the conditions that would enable everybody to thrive is a challenge that requires audacious new thinking.

So, we asked Joss Tantram, a founding partner of Terrafiniti, to share with us his best big ideas – and that’s what he’s going to do this week and for the next four weeks.

This week is Part 1: Discounting the discount rate.

The Towards 9 Billion ebook series is out now and can be downloaded for free at the Terrafiniti website.